A root canal is a dental procedure to remove dead or dying nerve tissue and bacteria from inside a tooth.

Description

A dentist will use a needle to place numbing medicine (anesthetic) around the bad tooth. You may feel a slight prick when the needle is being inserted.

Next, your dentist uses a tiny drill to remove a small portion of the top part of your tooth to expose the pulp. This is typically called access.

Pulp is made up of nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. It is found inside the tooth and runs to the jaw bone. Pulp supplies blood to a tooth and allows you to feel sensations such as temperature.

The infected pulp is removed with special tools called files. The canals (tiny pathways inside the tooth) are cleaned. Medicines may be placed into the area to make sure all the germs are removed and to prevent further infection.

The cleaned tooth area is sealed with a soft, temporary material. Once the tooth is filled, a permanent crown may be placed on top.

You may be given antibiotics to treat and prevent infection.

Why the Procedure is Performed

A root canal is done if you have an infection that affects the pulp of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can be the result of a tooth crack, cavity, or injury. It may also be the result of a deep pocket in the gum area around a tooth.

If this is the case, a dental specialist known as a periodontist should examine the area.

A root canal can save your tooth. Without treatment, the tooth may become so damaged that it must be removed.

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2017-12-04T14:49:59+00:00