Should You Bleach Your Teeth?

If you want whiter teeth, you probably already know that most of what you can do at home only removes surface stains. Changing the shade of your enamel requires bleaching. And that can mean a trip to the dentist to sit in front of that mysterious blue light. It can sound like a serious undertaking, and it costs a lot more than baking soda toothpaste, so before you get into the chair and say cheese, here’s everything you need to know about bleaching your teeth.

IT NEEDS TO BE STRONG ENOUGH. AND STAY ON LONG ENOUGH.

Bleaching requires a whitening chemical—in this case, hydrogen peroxide. But it’s not enough to just swipe it on. The bleach needs to remain on your teeth long enough to sink in.

“If you have a bleaching pen and you just rub it on your teeth, that’s not going to stay on,” says NYC-based cosmetic dentist Dr. Brian Kantor of Lowenberg, Lituchy & Kantor.

Proper bleaching systems, like the ones described here, are designed to deliver the one-two punch of concentrated peroxide and enough time.

IT WON’T WORK ON ALL TEETH.

For bleaching to make a difference, your teeth need to have become discolored over time. If your incisors were always a little off-white, that might be the shade you’re stuck with.

“There are teeth that will not bleach at all,” says Kantor. “If someone had white teeth and drank a lot of coffee and tea and wine, those teeth will bleach better than someone who was just born with darker teeth.”

As a rule, yellowed teeth bleach better than ones that have a grayish tint. Also, certain dental work such as crowns won’t bleach well.

You can check out the other half of this article on Men’s Health here: http://bit.ly/2qqfS42 
2017-11-17T13:22:55+00:00

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